Cardio Before Strength or After?

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  1. Check out this thread from earlier today http://portland.craigslist.org/forums/?ID=85876283
    It might give you some ideas. Also, hello from a fellow Portlander. There seem to be a few of us here.

  2. Yay for Portlanders! I've been on and off DiFo for nearly two years. It goes between lots of good advice, and lots of food obsession ("What did you have for breakfast?") which is exactly what I DON'T need, LOL.
    alone, I don't know where you're coming from, but I gotta say that Gazelle thingie does not look like much cardio. Are you getting good and hot and sweaty and huffing and puffing when using it? You should get to that point in a few minutes...or it's not much in the way of cardio. I can't tell how the machine is used, but the photos don't look promising.
    I got one of those "Health Rider" machines ($20 on Craigslist) and it was OK for the first few months, but once I actually started becoming capable of real cardio, it didn't do much for me.
    I can't answer your direct query about strength training - I never got any desirable benefits out of strength training, so I don't do it any more.
    BTW...semi poll in PDX...where in PDX are you, generally. I'm out west, past the West Hills.

  3. Hello! The Gazelle is kind of like cross country skiing and an elliptical. I absolutely get sweaty from it, much more than walking briskly.
    As for the strength training, I'm not really body building or anything of the like, I'm really just trying to tone up and get some of the muscles back that I lost when I became overweight.
    Both of the machines really kick my behind in a workout, so I feel like they are doing something...but I've only done them for a couple of days now.
    I lived about 30 years in SE Portland (with a few years here and there in other parts, but mostly in SE). About 5 years, I moved up north to Vancouver. It's WAY cheaper to live up here than in Portland.
    Thanks again!

  4. I live in close-in NW From what I've seen of the Gazelle it can be as intense - or not - as you like. I think you can get a decent workout from it.

  5. I'm in SE-Clackamas

  6. Hello from another PDXer I'm in NE. Perhaps someday we'll have to plan a get-together!

  7. How about a healthy get-together? Like, we all meet at Tom McCall waterfront park and go for a walk?
    Beats the old standby of a burger and a beer ;)

  8. I'd be up for that Anyone who wants to go walking is welcome to email me!

  9. Thank You! I didn't see it from earlier. I will check it out ASAP.

  10. my trainer said i myself have been trying to get on track so i got a trainer. what he has me do is warmup with cardio for 5 mins then do 45- 60 mins of strength and after that 20 mins of cardio. he said the last 20 of cardio thightens things back up so if you have alot of weight to lose you wont have sagging skin after. good luck hope it helps.

  11. My trainer did similar.... For strength building, it was 5-10 minutes aerobics (we didn't call it "cardio" back in those days) to get the lungs working and the oxygen flow beefed up. Then do whole-body workouts; emphasizing motions that worked ALL the muscles. Using a 20 pound sledge hammer to pound on rocks, for instance, way better than machines that isolate muscles. Lunges, squats, things like that, which use many of the lower muscles, not just a few. Then, 20 minutes of aerobics to loosen back up.
    For the weight-loss regimen, it was a MINIMUM of 40 minutes of sweating with aerobics. The theory was that the first 20 minutes only uses up the glycogens stored in your muscles. After that 20 minutes, the next 20 minutes focuses on any undigested sugars in your system. Only after THEY are gone, will your body start metabolizing fat. If you have not eaten before the aerobics, the fat loss starts at 20 minutes. That was the theory back then in popular literature, and I'm told that running coaches today still go by it.
    But, that advice is what they give to folks who are nominally fit - no more than 20-30 pounds overweight, etc. If you're so heavy that your bodily structure is at risk, you have to take it easier.

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